New Perfume Reviews Scent Trunk November 2019 and December 2019- Perfumer’s Paradise (Part 2)

As I continue my exploration of the new iteration of Scent Trunk I look at their first two monthly offerings.

November 2019 by Tyler Monk

One of the themes I will touch on consistently through these reviews is the choice of keynote. Mr. Monk launched his own independent brand called Luvandus five years ago. I have not tried any of them. I don’t know whether November 2019 is an outlier or more of the same. What I do know is it is a perfume which reminds me of my morning gardening duties.

Tyler Monk

During the midsummer days, all my gardening takes place soon after sunrise. There is a pleasure to digging in the dirt to begin the day. November 2019 captures that with pennyroyal as the keynote. Readers will know of my aversion to mint in perfume. Pennyroyal is a relative of spearmint. Except it is not. It is the dirty punk cousin of spearmint who maybe hasn’t had a shower. There is the herbal aspect of mint but there are way rougher scented edges that I am not thinking of dental products when I smell it. Mr. Monk centers his perfume around that.

That punk spearmint shows up at the start. Mr. Monk begins to develop what will become a gradual increase in the earthiness overall with the addition of carrot seed. It acts as a social worker to the pennyroyal trying to clean up its act a bit using some orange soap. Anise provides its herbal licorice which finds a lovely harmony with the pennyroyal. This is where November 2019 hits its high point. That earthiness I spoke of becomes more pronounced through the base accord of tobacco, chestnut, and oud. This is that moist dirt I dig through in the morning. As the pennyroyal, anise, and tobacco find their stride November 2019 soars. November 2019 has 12-14 hour longevity and average sillage.

December 2019 by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

If I were going to guess a perfumer who would be part of this it would be Ms. Hurwitz. She has always been excited to stretch her boundaries under different circumstances than her own DSH Perfumes brand. She has always been one of my favorites because I have seen the experimentation lead to something amazing. I suspect a part of December 2019 will be seen again in a future composition.

Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

The keynote she builds this perfume upon is coriander. Coriander is one of those bifocal spices, piquant and woody. Ms. Hurwitz expands upon both. Early on using hemlock, sage, and cardamom the spiciness is on top. It forms an accord of dense green foliage. Once you push through you find a heart of rose and orris adding a soft floral effect. The base coalesces around labdanum as leather, tobacco, and musk provide a partner to the woody part of coriander. December 2019 has 10-12 hour longevity and moderate sillage.

I’ll conclude my look at Scent Trunk with the other two samples sent to me and some closing thoughts tomorrow.

Disclosure: This review is based on samples provided by Scent Trunk.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review DSH Perfumes BIWA- A Legacy of Love and Passion for Perfume

In ten years of CaFleureBon Editor-in-Chief Michelyn Camen has had an uncanny ability to find perfume lovers who want to communicate that via the written word. The colleagues I had for the first four years when I was Managing Editor through to the current roster of singular voices bringing Ms. Camen’s vision of “scented salon” to life. Different voices creating a site which celebrates the diversity of perspective about perfume.

Robert Herrmann

One of those writers she brought into her salon was Robert Herrmann. Mr. Herrmann started writing for the blog in 2016. Every writer expresses themselves differently. One of the things about Mr. Herrmann’s columns was his sense of joy. Some perfumes he wrote about reminded him of places and people from his past. He elegantly wove that into his description. I never met Mr. Herrmann but his was the kind of writing which allowed me to come to know him.

Tragically his voice would be stilled in October of 2019; succumbing to a long-term health battle. His words will live on, but Mr. Herrmann had another idea. He wanted to creatively direct a perfume to live on after him. He called Ms. Camen in the last weeks of his life. In his final days he had a specific formula along with a specified perfumer he wanted to achieve it. He would leave all of it in Ms. Camen’s capable hands.

Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

Ms. Camen is a determined artist on any given day. When given a task for a friend like Mr. Herrmann she is exactly the person to see it through. It helped immensely that the perfumer Mr. Herrmann wanted to compose his perfume was Dawn Spencer Hurwitz. Ms. Hurwitz is one of many things I cherish from my days of working at CaFleureBon. She has been a friend to Ms. Camen for years. The same was true for Mr. Herrmann. When she learned of this request, she was honored to take it up. The more complete story can be found in this article at CaFleureBon.

This is the genius of Ms. Camen’s vision. She created a community where this kind of request wasn’t a bridge too far. It was the natural extension of those who share love and passion for perfume. DSH Perfumes BIWA is the result of that.

BIWA refers to a lake in Japan where a variety of freshwater pearls are harvested. Mr. Herrmann wanted to evoke the rarity and pearlescence of these tiny jewels into fragrance. Ms. Hurwitz is one of my favorite perfumers, but it is when she is given an Asian theme, like BIWA, where her work reaches a new level. This continues that. Following the instructions given by Mr. Herrmann under the eye of Ms. Camen, Ms. Hurwitz would deliver.

Mr. Hermann was a lover of aldehydes in perfume. It is no surprise that he wanted those to be where BIWA begins. The shading he had asked for was a bit of mint. This is the herbal version of mint given a more vegetal quality. It makes the mist of aldehydes glow like the reflection of the vegetation off the early morning fog rising off the lake. Ms. Hurwitz is one of the very few perfumers who has perfected a rice accord. It appears here as if it is the breakfast of one of the pearl harvesters as they stand on the shoreline. Jasmine and vanilla scent the steam off the rice with differing vectors of sweetness. Breakfast finished, our harvester looks through the hinoki and evergreens on the shore. The first breeze of the day brings the transparent scent of the woods while removing the mist from off the lake.

BIWA has 10-12 hour longevity and moderate sillage.

The best things in perfume seem to work when all concerned are on the same page. BIWA is a classic extension of the other Asian inspired perfumes by Ms. Hurwitz. There is a serenity to most all of them. It speaks to place in my perfumed center where I am most calm. Mr. Herrmann seemed to know instinctually that BIWA was right in her wheelhouse. This is a gorgeous paean to beauty of purpose filled with heart and soul.

Disclosure: this review is based on a sample provided by DSH Perfumes.

Mark Behnke

Editor’s Note: All proceeds from BIWA will be donated to Mr. Herrmann’s husband to defray the significant medical costs incurred. It can be found at Indigo Perfumery or DSH Perfumes.

Perfume in the Time of Coronavirus

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I am a generally happy person. The current coronavirus pandemic has worn away at that. I like to be informed but this time the more I learned the bluer I felt. Over the last few days I’ve unplugged from the news streams except for watching the local and national news for an hour. It has helped. The other thing that has helped is my love for perfume.

To fill up the time I’ve been working in the perfume vault. I am surprised at how much beauty there is to be found. I shouldn’t be, I write about it every day. On those shelves are history lessons, trips to faraway places, exceptional artistic visions; all of which are fascinating. I’ve been allowing myself the luxury of letting scent take me away.

I have spent some of my time getting lost in my favorite perfume house, Patou. The Art Deco bottles seem appropriate as we enter this century’s own 20’s. The great Joy was created in 1925. I was struck by the way that perfume seems timeless. It is what a floral perfume should be at any time.

I turned to the Japanese inspired perfumes by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz for serenity. My favorite perfume by one of my favorite perfumers is her Bancha. I usually demur when asked to name a single perfume when asked what is the one I like best. Bancha is one which is unequivocal in my affection. I always wear Bancha on the first day of spring. The same sense of tranquility and hope descended upon me with each breath I took as it does every year. It is especially appropriate now.

Alessandro Brun, Me, Riccardo Tedeschi (l. to r.)

I hadn’t thought about what a great collection the Masque Milano perfumes have become until I spent an afternoon with them covering different patches of skin. It is such a varied collection that I smelled like a pile-up on the perfume interstate. Yet there is a real sense of vision now that there are several perfumes to examine. Alessandro Brun and Riccardo Tedeschi are in the midst of creating perfume which will stand the test of time. To spend this time with them has been illuminating.

I decided to go around the world while sitting at my desk. Perfumes took me to every continent all while never leaving the house.

I’ve never had the best answer when asked why I have so much perfume. Maybe I was just waiting for a time when all that I enjoy can be there as emotional support. I think those days have arrived. Perfume in the time of coronavirus will be what gets me through.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review DSH Perfumes Gum Tree Cabin- The Tree Whisperer

My favorite independent perfumers have different strengths. Dawn Spencer Hurwitz is one of the best at working successfully across multiple genres. Even though I have many of her varied creations there are two styles where she connects with me. One is her Japanese inspired fragrances. So many of them are among my favorite perfumes from anyone. The other place she excels is in perfumes which celebrate trees as DSH Perfumes Gum Tree Cabin does.

Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

Ms. Hurwitz watched the fires in Australia and wanted to help. Her response was to create Gum Tree Cabin with 30% of the proceeds to be donated to the “Fire Relief Fund for First Nation Communities”. Based on this she chose a uniquely Australian ingredient as the keynote, eucalyptus leaves. It results in a singular woody perfume.

It opens with an herbal green top accord. Ms. Hurwitz uses a Spanish lavender which tilts more to the herbal as the spine upon which to append rosemary and clary sage. It forms a sturdy framework for the eucalyptus leaf to take residence in. That eucalyptus leaf is not the Vicks Vapo-Rub scent you might be expecting. It is a softer leafier smell with mentholated underpinnings. I’m not sure if I’ve ever smelled it at this concentration prior to this. I found it invigorating on these early spring days. The eucalyptus leaf stays front and center while the woody walls of the cabin go up around it. Fir, cedar, and sandalwood make them up. The joints are filled in with birch tar, tree moss, and Choya ral. The last ingredient provides the rustic charm of a cabin as construction is compete.

Gum Tree Cabin has 10-12 hour longevity and average sillage.

From a perfumer who has been so prolific I don’t think I’ve ever smelled a perfume quite like this from Ms. Hurwitz. It is a distinct woody perfume where she uses the eucalyptus leaf to stitch together the three most prominent woody ingredients in fragrance. As part of her previous portfolio of woody scents like The Voices of Trees or last year’s Colorado; Gum Tree Resin cements Ms. Hurwitz as The Tree Whisperer of independent perfumery.

Disclosure: This review is based on a sample provided by DSH Perfumes.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review DSH Perfumes Lautrec- Memories of Artists

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Just about ten years ago I joined Michelyn Camen as one of the first writers at a blog called CaFleureBon. The four years I would spend there were like blogging graduate school. Ms. Camen is brilliantly inventive about everything that goes into communicating about perfume. Our first year often felt like we were a fledgling bird learning to fly. We were so happy to reach the end of that first year Ms. Camen wanted to celebrate with a perfume made to recognize that. She turned to independent perfumer Dawn Spencer Hurwitz who produced DSH Perfumes Lautrec under Ms. Camen’s creative direction. Lautrec has been re-released as part of the Heirloom Elixir Series.

Michelyn Camen

For those who have read CaFleureBon over the past ten years you will know one of the signatures of it is the art direction of Ms. Camen. Working as creative director with Ms. Hurwitz they chose the painting “Woman with Black Boa” by Toulouse-Lautrec. The perfume was meant to evoke the Bohemian scene in France at the end of the 19th century that Toulouse-Lautrec was so pivotal in exposing to the masses through his art. It means it was meant to have a vintage feel to its construction. Where it gets its contemporary twist is the gourmand base which lifts it all towards the end.

Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

Reacquainting myself with this perfume I smile inwardly at the difference nine years of perspective has added. In my original review I only give a passing thought to the floral fruitiness of orange blossom and passionfruit. In 2020 I take more notice of the interplay between the richness of both. The same boozy keynote which held my fascination prior, absinthe, comes forward again. This time I think I detect a finer hand in the tincture of wormwood used for the absinthe. This version of Lautrec has a more brilliant Green Fairy as the keynote. A gorgeous fulsome floral bouquet of rose, jasmine, and ylang-ylang provide a lively gaiety appropriate to the time period. Then we get this magnificent gourmand shift to chocolate and resins meant to capture the Green Fairy in a cage of fondant surrounded by flowers. It completes a night out in the Moulin Rouge, painting the scene with fragrance.

Lautrec has 12-14 hour longevity and average sillage.

Lautrec reminds me of artists then and now. Toulouse-Lautrec’s way of bringing the hidden society out to the rest of the world. Ms. Camen’s creation of a place where the art of perfume is comingled with the visual arts. Ms. Hurwitz’s growth as a perfumer into one of the premier artists in all independent perfumery. Together Lautrec is an homage to the memory of artists.

Disclosure: This review is based on a sample provided by DSH Perfumes.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review DSH Perfumes MaccaBees (Holiday No. 19)- Hanukkah Contemplations

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There are only a tiny few perfumers who have earned enough trust with me to hold a spot during the final weeks of December. Dawn Spencer Hurwitz is one of them. One reason I will always do it is she has been producing a Holiday perfume for nineteen years. Ms. Hurwitz has found the scent of the season in so many ways she has very often provided new perspective to a part of them for me. That is true of her non-Holiday perfumes, too. They provide the kind of insight that can only come from an independent mindset. For this year she looks at the origins of the most famous symbol of Hanukkah in DSH Perfumes MaccaBees (Holiday No. 19).

Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

If there is one thing people who aren’t Jewish know about Hanukkah it is the menorah with its candles burning bright. Half of my family by choice is Jewish. Their actual families always welcomed me; along with my irritating questions. I always liked when Hanukkah was early because it felt like I could enjoy both parts of the Judeo-Christian Holiday Season with my best friends. The years when it is together, like this one, I felt like I missed out on something. Not really it was just more intense. I always enjoyed watching the beeswax candles burn when they got low. Casting warm flame colored light upon the metal of the menorah. There was a comfort to it all. That is the type of perfume MaccaBees is; a contemplative comfort fragrance.

The name comes from the 200 BC revolt led by Judah Maccabee against the Romans in Judea. The new rulers had seized the temple; turning it into one dedicated to the Roman gods. The Maccabees revolted taking back the temple. During the rededication the menorah only had enough oil to burn for one night but instead burned for eight nights in total. This is the foundational event for Hanukkah and the menorah as its symbol.

Ms. Hurwitz has worked previously on making perfumes based on ancient Egyptian formulas. There is a touch of that here as she relies on some of those traditional fragrant oils from the time period. The name with the capitalized “B” in the middle is to clue you in there is some honey trapped in those beeswax candles. It flows together into a classic Holiday perfume.

It is the candles we start with. The beeswax is given a gentle coating of honey. The overall effect is more candle than honeycomb. Ms. Hurwitz finds a lovely replacement for a sweet viscous liquid as she uses the maple syrup quality of immortelle. Immortelle is a much easier sweetness to control. It also carries a slightly smoky quality which captures the swirls coming off the flame tip as they rise away. This is all built upon a foundation of resins. Myrrh, oppoponax, frankincense, and oud. This forms that warmly contemplative accord to finish things.

MaccaBees has 10-12 hour longevity and is a skin scent as an oil.

Ms. Hurwitz was reminding us of her past eighteen Holiday scents on her Facebook page. As I looked back, I realized MaccaBees might be the most traditional of them all. There is everything right in finding a perfume which makes remembering the reasons why we celebrate.

Disclosure: This review is based on a sample provided by DSH Perfumes.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review DSH Perfumes Royal Grey Cologne- Sense of Familiarity

When I talk about writing on perfume with people who don’t wear fragrance, I point out they may not wear it but they are surrounded by it. You can’t walk into a coffee shop without being surrounded by the smell of brewing beans. A bakery smells of bread. The produce section in the grocery store is a wonderful mélange of fresh smells. Perhaps the most recognizable of these ambient scents is the smell of Earl Grey Tea. Independent perfumer Dawn Spencer Hurwitz has made an all-natural Earl Grey inspired cologne called DSH Perfumes Royal Grey Cologne.

Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

Ms. Hurwitz has been producing great colognes for a while. Last year’s Summer Cologne was one of my favorites of the year. You might think designing an Earl Grey cologne would be easy. Get some bergamot and combine it with any one of the black tea ingredients. I am not sure what exactly that would smell like, but I suspect it would be flat, missing an essential sparkle. Royal Grey Cologne does something different as Ms. Hurwitz uses a tea accord comprised of four different tea sources.

Royal Grey Cologne opens with that bergamot in high concentration. Underneath Ms. Hurwitz adds ambrette seed to add some lift to this very identifiable top note. The tea follows rather quickly. I’m expecting black tea and that is what I notice first. Then three green tea extracts provide a lively boost to the black tea. Yerba mate especially finds a place within this accord. Then a lovely rose finds itself floating on this cup of tea. The transition to the base takes an earthy turn as ruh khus, the green balsamic version of vetiver, connects to patchouli before resting on sandalwood sweetened with a pinch of vanilla.

Royal Grey Cologne has 6-8 hour longevity and low sillage.

Royal Grey Cologne is a skin scent as was last year’s Summer Cologne. I find that an advantage when wearing fragrance in hot temperatures. I enjoyed Royal Grey Cologne as much for its sense of familiarity as its underlying freshness. Just like a cup of the real thing.

Disclosure: This review is based on a sample provided by DSH Perfumes.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review DSH Perfumes Oudh Noir- Outside the Firelight

In “Game of Thrones” one of the characters says “the night is dark and full of terrors”. It is why humanity used fire to keep it at bay during the time when the sun has set. Anyone who has spent time outdoors in a wild setting around a campfire knows the sound of creatures stirring just outside the circle of light. On a trip to Montana a moose decided to remind us there were creatures beyond our firelight by hightailing it through camp. There was another night where there was a musky feral smell which drew near but didn’t reveal itself. When there are perfumes which have a significant raw animalic aspect I am often reminded of that. When I tried DSH Perfumes Oudh Noir I found a fragrance which was the entirety of that experience.

Independent perfumer Dawn Spencer Hurwitz has begun a new sub-collection called “Heirloom Elixirs”. They are meant to be limited editions. Oudh Noir was #2 released simultaneously with #3 Aoud Blanc representing an “Oud in Chairoscuro” duo. Not sure what it says about me, but I was attracted to the darkness over the light. Part of what appealed to me was this sense of standing in a circle of firelight while the wild things circled.

Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

Oudh Noir opens with oud representing the woodsmoke. The surrounding trees are portrayed by sandalwood and cedar. That is the smoky circle of light. A haze of tobacco is as if I am muttering a Native American chant to keep me safe while tossing tobacco into the flames. Then the scent of the earth being moved by something large comes forth in patchouli. A swirl of spices accompanies the earthiness. The scent of the beast, perhaps? Then a feral animalic accord circles the light. This is a snarling pacing bit of musk and fur. It tiptoes right up to the edge of being rank. A leathery quality emerges to prevent that. Oudh Noir remains at this point for hours. It isn’t until the dawn appears over the horizon that the beast retreats only leaving the embers of the fire.

DSH Perfumes Oudh noir has 12-14 hour longevity and average sillage.

It is rare for any perfumer to let the skanky animalic notes have the lead in a perfume. I think it probably only appeals to a certain kind of perfume lover. Oudh Noir is one which allows me to wonder what is outside the firelight with pleasure.

Disclosure: this review is based on a sample provided by DSH Perfumes

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Dawn Spencer Hurwitz for American Perfumer Colorado- High-Altitude Heart

One of many things I learned while I was managing editor at CaFleureBon was the breadth of creativity in American Perfumery. Editor-in-Chief Michelyn Camen has been the most tireless supporter of these national treasures through her series on CaFleureBon called Profiles in American Perfumery. Over 130 posts where the perfumer speaks in their own words. I had always wondered if there was enough for someone to open a store dedicated to American independent perfume.

Inside American Perfume in Louisville, Kentucky

The answer came this past September with the opening of American Perfumer in Louisville, Kentucky. Owner Dave Kern opened a shop dedicated to showcasing the best of American independent perfume. When I looked over what he chose to fill his shelves it was obvious he had gathered brands from every part of the country. What I was hoping for, was over time Mr. Kern would collaborate with some of these artists for limited editions exclusive to the store. It turns out Mr. Kern was way ahead of me. He was going to do this right away.

When I asked him about how he chose who to ask to do the first two he answered, “When I started to reach out to American perfumers about the AMERICAN PERFUMER concept two years ago, Dawn and Maria both quickly emerged as friends, advisors and confidants. As two people that I had tremendous respect for, their immediate encouragement, and enthusiasm for what I was proposing, gave me great confidence that I was onto something.” The Dawn is Dawn Spencer Hurwitz of DSH Perfumes and the Maria is Maria McElroy of aroma M and House of Cherry Bomb. Mr. Kern continued, “Launching the Limited Editions with them was always the plan. Practically speaking, Dawn and Maria are quality assurance. I knew they’d make beautiful, interesting work and get it done on time. That said, in every way, they exceeded my expectations.”

Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

Over the next two days I am going to review both gorgeous limited editions which show off the heart and soul of American Perfumery. I start today with Dawn Spencer Hurwitz for American Perfumer Colorado and will follow tomorrow with Maria McElroy for American Perfumer Desert Flower.

Like many of the best perfumes they start with a simple query. This one began with Mr. Kern asking Ms. Hurwitz “what Colorado smelled like.” Ms. Hurwitz is based in Boulder, Colorado which makes it easy for her to answer that question. For those who are fans of Ms. Hurwitz’s perfume she has been showing us what Colorado smells like in perfumes like The Voices of Trees, Mountain Sage, or Rocky Mountain High. Colorado fits in that continuum as you breathe in the high-altitude milieu on the slopes of the Rockies.

Ms. Hurwitz opens Colorado on a top accord primarily of spruce. To keep that from becoming too generic in its piney-ness Ms. Hurwitz cleverly supports it with a sunbeam of neroli and a softening of the terpenic sharpness with softer leafy ingredients. This blunts the pine needles from getting too sharp right off the bat. As we gain altitude we pass through a stand of clean woods of cedar and sandalwood. Ms. Hurwitz winds strands of jasmine and immortelle through the woods to capture the wildflowers in bloom. The immortelle adds a richness to these otherwise straightforward woody ingredients. Once you reach the highest altitude all you have left are the sentinel pine trees overseeing the valley. The base accord is a superbly realized mixture of three sources of pine combined with balsam. This is that breath of chilled air carrying the scent of the trees along with it. A subtle filament of cade swirls though as if woodsmoke from a cabin far below has risen to the peak.

Colorado has 10-12 hour longevity and average sillage.

If you are a fan of any of Ms. Hurwitz’s perfumes which feature pine, Colorado is an essential piece of that series. They are among my very favorite styles that Ms. Hurwitz produces. I have always found the perfumes from Ms. Hurwitz to display the heart of an artist at work. In Colorado she shares the love of the place she lives with a perfume that soars over her personal American landscape.

Disclosure: This review is based on a sample provided by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review DSH Perfumes Uptown Moonshine (Holiday No. 18)- Unorthodox Gourmand

There are many things which indicate the Holidays have arrived. One of them is the release of the new Holiday perfume by DSH Perfumes. Since 2000 independent perfumer Dawn Spencer Hurwitz has created a new perfume for the Season. What I always look forward to is she does not make a perfume of fir trees and woodsmoke. She fixes on another part of the Holiday milieu and uses it as the focal point. For the 2018 version it is a gourmand-y version of whiskey, tobacco, and brown sugar called Uptown Moonshine.

Once things begin to wind down after a hectic day of events, during this time of year, I find just sitting still with some appropriate music and a glass of my favorite whiskey to be ideal. The best whiskeys have a perfume all their own. Capturing the wood of the barrel they aged in along with the inherent earthy sweetness of the liquid itself. As I decompress the smell of the whiskey is as important as the inner warmth it provides.

Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

I’ve never smoked but the smell of tobacco has been a favorite. I especially enjoy the scent of the dried and cured leaf as it hangs in a drying barn. When you encounter it like that you get a rich narcotic sweet scent along with a harmonic of menthol-like cool.

Ms. Hurwitz uses both as the nucleus of Uptown Moonshine which through the early going is enjoyable enough, but things really take a turn for the amazing when brown sugar gets involved creating a gourmand version of illicit delights.

Uptown Moonshine opens with the whiskey out in front. Ms. Hurwitz uses a trio of woods, oak, sandalwood, and cabreuva to form the barrel. The tobacco arrives next trailing a few florals in its wake. As it takes its place next to the whiskey it forms a rich decadent effect that I wouldn’t have thought could become even more so. Then it happens as a brown sugar accord inserts itself. This finds the spaces in between the whiskey and tobacco at first. Over time it begins to take on prominence turning it into an eccentric style of gourmand as the brown sugar takes the lead. The final bit is some peru balsam to smooth everything out into a compelling peculiar confection.

Uptown Moonshine has 8-10 hour longevity and average sillage.

If you’ve been looking for an unorthodox gourmand perfume in your Holiday stocking, Uptown Moonshine is it.

Disclosure: this review is based on a sample provided by DSH Perfumes.

Mark Behnke